Coronavirus has created new realities for every industry. The drug and alcohol treatment field is no different. There is no argument that rehab remains essential even during this pandemic. In fact, with widespread isolation and a collapsing economy, addiction and relapse risks exponentially increase. An opioid epidemic exacerbated by coronavirus stays on center stage, and treatment facilities are on the frontlines.

The country is on lockdown. Challenges to provide people suffering from drug and alcohol addiction with good treatment options grow daily. Directors, clinicians, and counselors are being asked to draw on every ounce of creativity and courage they possess. The clients they service are being told to find strength they had no idea was within them.

The gauntlet has been thrown down to the recovery community.

 They are responding. Everywhere.

We need to appreciate the resiliency this situation has brought out in the addiction population. Admissions protocols have necessarily become more difficult. Every prospective patient needs to undergo additional screening. Roommates, often so integral to a new inpatient client’s acclimation, cannot be assigned immediately upon arrival. Support systems have shrunk. Family visits in many cases are impossible. Field trips can’t be held. Once someone gains admittance they are basically stuck there.

Yet so many courageous souls still knock on the door. They recognize that they need help and won’t be turned away. If anyone has any doubts about people in this community and their intrinsic value, maybe listen in on admissions calls happening now across the country. Hear their hope for a better future and learn from their courage, spirit, and perseverance.  Walk into a facility (figuratively, of course). See how the precious individuals inside are there for each other, carrying each other. Laughing, crying, and growing.

 In a time where many are struggling to stay positive and hopeful, we have much to learn from the recovery community.

A thunderous ovation is due to overworked staff as well. So many have taken personal safety risks to be at work and to stay at work. Perhaps most crucially and certainly most difficult, they continue producing incredible results at work.

The plaudits have been given to ERs, first responders, doctors, and nurses battling coronavirus, and rightfully so. They deserve every bit of it.

So do the people saving lives in the shadows. The ones figuring out how do group sessions with monitor hookups. Those organizing meal shifts and making sure to adhere to every last CDC guideline. Coming up with team activities that can be performed at proper distances. Clients can’t leave the premises, and regular schedules have been upended.  Facilities have figured out ways to use the lack of distraction for inner growth. They keep morale up and allow for zeroed in focus on recovery and progress.

People are tasked with nightmarish logistical challenges and getting it done with whatever limited resources they can get their hands on. All-nighters are being pulled by back office staff staying on top of evolving policy changes. They work in the darkness of night to bring others the light of day. Without recognition and in the absence of national adulation. They do it because they deeply care.

Take this anecdote as an example. One of our drug and alcohol detox facilities is near New Orleans, a particularly hard-hit area of the country. They lease space from a local hospital. As the pandemic intensified, the hospital asked the detox unit to evacuate. Every bed was needed.

We had to go but what of our patients? Our responsibility to them is a boulder that cannot be moved.

Within days, a new location nearby was identified, and the work to set up a temporary detox unit began. Amidst all the chaos and logistics that even in normal times are very complex, it seemed a ridiculous undertaking. Impossible.

Our staff got it done. In days. Because the people we treat are family, and you never turn your back on family.

Those of us privy to their superhuman efforts are inspired. We applaud the creative thinking, the relentlessness, and the dedication.

There are moments in history where we are asked for more, where we are asked to push beyond what we had always thought was the limit of possible. It is there where we see the essence of human capability, resiliency and capacity to rise.

 During another era which called for more, for no less a cause than the founding of this great country, Abigail Adams, wife of John and an equal partner in all that he accomplished, wrote these unforgettable words:

“It is not in the still calm of life or the repose of a pacific station, that great characters are formed. The habits of a vigorous mind are formed in contending with difficulties. Great necessities call out great virtues. When a mind is raised, and animated by scenes that engage the heart, then those qualities which would otherwise lay dormant, wake into life and form the character of a hero.”

In front of our eyes, we are watching the formation of legions of heroes. They are popping up everywhere, like fresh growth after torrential rains. Hospitals, doctors, nurses, first responders, neighbors, and friends.

And by the recovery community.  People in recovery and people entering recovery. Drug and alcohol treatment staff, clinicians, counselors, and back office personnel.

People pushing limits, setting new boundaries. Extending the meaning of possible and doable.

People becoming heroes.  

Maybe it is too quiet, maybe the applause is not quite loud enough.

But maybe that silence is not a lack of appreciation for the greatness so many have reached.

Maybe it is the silence of awe.

Our National Nurses Week 2020 Heroes

It’s National Nurses Day!
“𝙒𝙝𝙚𝙣 𝙮𝙤𝙪’𝙧𝙚 𝙖 𝙣𝙪𝙧𝙨𝙚 𝙮𝙤𝙪 𝙠𝙣𝙤𝙬 𝙩𝙝𝙖𝙩 𝙚𝙫𝙚𝙧𝙮 𝙙𝙖𝙮 𝙮𝙤𝙪 𝙬𝙞𝙡𝙡 𝙩𝙤𝙪𝙘𝙝 𝙖 𝙡𝙞𝙛𝙚 𝙤𝙧 𝙖 𝙡𝙞𝙛𝙚 𝙬𝙞𝙡𝙡 𝙩𝙤𝙪𝙘𝙝 𝙮𝙤𝙪𝙧𝙨”
Let’s meet some of the stars of the Avenues Recovery family!

Meet Star Nurse Amanda Brown of Avenues Recovery Center: Find Your Way Home of Maryland!

Meet Star Nurse Kenneth Bohne of Avenues Recovery Center: Find Your Way Home at Townsend Treatment Centers of New Orleans!

Meet Star Nurse Dorcas of Avenues Recovery Center: Find Your Way Home of Bucks!

Meet Star APRN Piettra Alves of Avenues Recovery Center: Find Your Way Home of Oklahoma!

Avenues: 𝘞𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘥𝘳𝘪𝘷𝘦𝘴 you 𝘵𝘰 𝘴𝘩𝘰𝘸 𝘶𝘱 𝘦𝘷𝘦𝘳𝘺 𝘥𝘢𝘺 𝘦𝘷𝘦𝘯 𝘥𝘶𝘳𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘊𝘖𝘝𝘐𝘋?
Piettra: 𝙄 𝙩𝙧𝙪𝙡𝙮 𝙖𝙙𝙤𝙧𝙚 𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙘𝙖𝙧𝙚 𝙛𝙤𝙧 𝙢𝙮 𝙥𝙖𝙩𝙞𝙚𝙣𝙩𝙨. 𝙏𝙝𝙚𝙮 𝙨𝙩𝙞𝙡𝙡 𝙝𝙖𝙫𝙚 𝙢𝙚𝙙𝙞𝙘𝙖𝙡 𝙣𝙚𝙚𝙙𝙨 𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙄 𝙖𝙢 𝙝𝙚𝙧𝙚 𝙩𝙤 𝙝𝙚𝙡𝙥 𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙢. 𝙄 𝙖𝙢 𝙘𝙤𝙢𝙢𝙞𝙩𝙩𝙚𝙙 𝙩𝙤 𝙢𝙮 𝙘𝙖𝙧𝙚𝙚𝙧 𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙩𝙚𝙖𝙢 𝙄 𝙬𝙤𝙧𝙠 𝙬𝙞𝙩𝙝. .

Avenues: 𝘞𝘩𝘢𝘵’𝘴 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘮𝘰𝘴𝘵 𝘳𝘦𝘸𝘢𝘳𝘥𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘱𝘢𝘳𝘵 𝘰𝘧 your 𝘫𝘰𝘣?
Piettra: 𝙒𝙤𝙧𝙠𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙤𝙣𝙚 𝙤𝙣 𝙤𝙣𝙚 𝙬𝙞𝙩𝙝 𝙥𝙖𝙩𝙞𝙚𝙣𝙩𝙨 𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙨𝙚𝙚 𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙞𝙧 𝙜𝙧𝙤𝙬𝙩𝙝. 𝙄 𝙡𝙤𝙫𝙚 𝙗𝙚𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙬𝙞𝙩𝙝 𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙢 𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙞𝙧 𝙚𝙣𝙩𝙞𝙧𝙚 𝙨𝙩𝙖𝙮 𝙬𝙞𝙩𝙝 𝙪𝙨. 𝙄 𝙡𝙤𝙫𝙚 𝙩𝙤 𝙨𝙚𝙚 𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙞𝙧 𝙨𝙢𝙞𝙡𝙚𝙨 𝙬𝙝𝙚𝙣 𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙮 𝙗𝙚𝙜𝙞𝙣 𝙩𝙤 𝙡𝙤𝙫𝙚 𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙢𝙨𝙚𝙡𝙫𝙚𝙨 𝙖𝙜𝙖𝙞𝙣.

Avenues: 𝘞𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘤𝘩𝘢𝘭𝘭𝘦𝘯𝘨𝘦𝘴/𝘴𝘢𝘤𝘳𝘪𝘧𝘪𝘤𝘦𝘴 do you 𝘮𝘢𝘬𝘦 𝘵𝘰 𝘸𝘰𝘳𝘬 𝘪𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘴 𝘧𝘪𝘦𝘭𝘥 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘩𝘰𝘸 have you 𝘰𝘷𝘦𝘳𝘤𝘰𝘮𝘦 them?
Piettra: 𝙏𝙝𝙞𝙨 𝙞𝙨 𝙣𝙤𝙩 𝙖 9-5 𝙟𝙤𝙗. 𝙏𝙝𝙚𝙞𝙧 𝙣𝙚𝙚𝙙𝙨 𝙘𝙤𝙢𝙚 𝙖𝙩 𝙖𝙡𝙡 𝙤𝙪𝙧𝙨 𝙞𝙛 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙙𝙖𝙮 𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙖𝙣𝙮 𝙙𝙖𝙮 𝙤𝙛 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙬𝙚𝙚𝙠. 𝙄 𝙖𝙢 𝙖𝙫𝙖𝙞𝙡𝙖𝙗𝙡𝙚 𝙛𝙤𝙧 𝙨𝙩𝙖𝙛𝙛 𝙩𝙤 𝙘𝙖𝙡𝙡 𝙢𝙚 𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙄 𝙘𝙖𝙣 𝙘𝙤𝙢𝙚 𝙞𝙣 𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙨𝙚𝙚 𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙢 𝙤𝙧 𝙩𝙖𝙡𝙠 𝙬𝙞𝙩𝙝 𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙢 𝙞𝙛 𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙮 𝙝𝙖𝙫𝙚 𝙦𝙪𝙚𝙨𝙩𝙞𝙤𝙣𝙨.

Avenues: 𝘞𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘪𝘯𝘴𝘱𝘪𝘳𝘦𝘴 you 𝘸𝘰𝘳𝘬𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘪𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘢𝘥𝘥𝘪𝘤𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯 𝘧𝘪𝘦𝘭𝘥 𝘴𝘱𝘦𝘤𝘪𝘧𝘪𝘤𝘢𝘭𝘭𝘺?
Piettra: 𝙏𝙤 𝙗𝙚 𝙖𝙗𝙡𝙚 𝙩𝙤 𝙨𝙚𝙚 𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙢 𝙤𝙣 𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙞𝙧 𝙛𝙞𝙧𝙨𝙩 𝙙𝙖𝙮 𝙖𝙨 𝙬𝙚𝙡𝙡 𝙖𝙨 𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙞𝙧 𝙛𝙞𝙣𝙖𝙡 𝙙𝙖𝙮 𝙝𝙚𝙧𝙚 𝙬𝙞𝙩𝙝 𝙪𝙨. 𝘽𝙚𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙖 𝙥𝙖𝙧𝙩 𝙤𝙛 𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙞𝙧 𝙜𝙧𝙤𝙬𝙩𝙝 𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙟𝙤𝙪𝙧𝙣𝙚𝙮 𝙞𝙨 𝙩𝙧𝙪𝙡𝙮 𝙖 𝙗𝙡𝙚𝙨𝙨𝙞𝙣𝙜.

Meet Star LPN Armah Nkansah of Avenues Recovery Center: Find Your Way Home of Lake Ariel!

Avenues: 𝘞𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘥𝘳𝘪𝘷𝘦𝘴 you 𝘵𝘰 𝘴𝘩𝘰𝘸 𝘶𝘱 𝘦𝘷𝘦𝘳𝘺 𝘥𝘢𝘺 𝘦𝘷𝘦𝘯 𝘥𝘶𝘳𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘊𝘖𝘝𝘐𝘋?
Armah: 𝙈𝙮 𝙘𝙖𝙧𝙚 𝙛𝙤𝙧 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙘𝙡𝙞𝙚𝙣𝙩𝙨 𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙗𝙚𝙡𝙞𝙚𝙛 𝙞𝙣 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝘼𝙫𝙚𝙣𝙪𝙚𝙨 𝙢𝙞𝙨𝙨𝙞𝙤𝙣 𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙥𝙝𝙞𝙡𝙤𝙨𝙤𝙥𝙝𝙮 𝙙𝙧𝙞𝙫𝙚𝙨 𝙢𝙚 𝙩𝙤 𝙘𝙤𝙢𝙚 𝙩𝙤 𝙬𝙤𝙧𝙠 𝙚𝙫𝙚𝙣 𝙙𝙪𝙧𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝘾𝙤𝙫𝙞𝙙 19.

Avenues: 𝘞𝘩𝘢𝘵’𝘴 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘮𝘰𝘴𝘵 𝘳𝘦𝘸𝘢𝘳𝘥𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘱𝘢𝘳𝘵 𝘰𝘧 your 𝘫𝘰𝘣?
Armah: 𝙏𝙝𝙚 𝙗𝙚𝙨𝙩 𝙥𝙖𝙧𝙩 𝙤𝙛 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙟𝙤𝙗 𝙞𝙨 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙢𝙚𝙙𝙞𝙘𝙖𝙡 𝙩𝙚𝙖𝙢 𝙗𝙚𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙖𝙗𝙡𝙚 𝙩𝙤 𝙗𝙚 𝙥𝙖𝙧𝙩 𝙤𝙛 𝙖 𝙘𝙡𝙞𝙚𝙣𝙩𝙨 𝙩𝙧𝙚𝙖𝙩𝙢𝙚𝙣𝙩 𝙥𝙡𝙖𝙣 𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙬𝙖𝙩𝙘𝙝 𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙢 𝙩𝙝𝙧𝙞𝙫𝙚.

Avenues: 𝘞𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘤𝘩𝘢𝘭𝘭𝘦𝘯𝘨𝘦𝘴/𝘴𝘢𝘤𝘳𝘪𝘧𝘪𝘤𝘦𝘴 do you 𝘮𝘢𝘬𝘦 𝘵𝘰 𝘸𝘰𝘳𝘬 𝘪𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘴 𝘧𝘪𝘦𝘭𝘥 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘩𝘰𝘸 have you 𝘰𝘷𝘦𝘳𝘤𝘰𝘮𝘦 them?
Armah: 𝙏𝙝𝙚 𝙤𝙣𝙡𝙮 𝙢𝙞𝙣𝙤𝙧 𝙘𝙝𝙖𝙡𝙡𝙚𝙣𝙜𝙚 𝙞𝙣 𝙩𝙝𝙞𝙨 𝙛𝙞𝙚𝙡𝙙 𝙞𝙨 𝙩𝙝𝙖𝙩 𝙬𝙚 𝙝𝙖𝙫𝙚 𝙘𝙡𝙞𝙚𝙣𝙩𝙨 𝙛𝙧𝙤𝙢 𝙖𝙡𝙡 𝙗𝙖𝙘𝙠𝙜𝙧𝙤𝙪𝙣𝙙𝙨 𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙨𝙞𝙩𝙪𝙖𝙩𝙞𝙤𝙣𝙨 𝙨𝙤 𝙮𝙤𝙪 𝙣𝙚𝙚𝙙 𝙩𝙤 𝙗𝙚 𝙥𝙖𝙩𝙞𝙚𝙣𝙩 𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙖 𝙡𝙞𝙨𝙩𝙚𝙣𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙚𝙖𝙧 𝙛𝙤𝙧 𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙢 𝙩𝙤 𝙖𝙨𝙨𝙞𝙨𝙩 𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙢 𝙞𝙣 𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙞𝙧 𝙩𝙧𝙚𝙖𝙩𝙢𝙚𝙣𝙩 𝙥𝙡𝙖𝙣.

Avenues: 𝘞𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘪𝘯𝘴𝘱𝘪𝘳𝘦𝘴 you 𝘸𝘰𝘳𝘬𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘪𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘢𝘥𝘥𝘪𝘤𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯 𝘧𝘪𝘦𝘭𝘥 𝘴𝘱𝘦𝘤𝘪𝘧𝘪𝘤𝘢𝘭𝘭𝘺?
Armah: 𝙒𝙝𝙚𝙣 𝙄 𝙨𝙚𝙚 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙧𝙚𝙨𝙪𝙡𝙩𝙨 𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙥𝙧𝙤𝙜𝙧𝙚𝙨𝙨 𝙤𝙛 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙘𝙡𝙞𝙚𝙣𝙩𝙨 𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙝𝙤𝙬 𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙮 𝙖𝙧𝙚 𝙤𝙣 𝙙𝙖𝙮 1 𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙣 𝙤𝙣 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙙𝙖𝙮 𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙮 𝙡𝙚𝙖𝙫𝙚 𝙩𝙝𝙖𝙩 𝙞𝙨 𝙩𝙧𝙪𝙡𝙮 𝙞𝙣𝙨𝙥𝙞𝙧𝙖𝙩𝙞𝙤𝙣𝙖𝙡.

Meet Star Nurse Sandy Bell of Avenues Recovery Center: Find Your Way Home of New Hampshire!

𝘏𝘪, 𝘮𝘺 𝘯𝘢𝘮𝘦 𝘪𝘴 𝘚𝘢𝘯𝘥𝘺 𝘉𝘦𝘭𝘭. 𝘐 𝘢𝘮 𝘣𝘰𝘵𝘩 𝘢 𝘧𝘢𝘮𝘪𝘭𝘺 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘱𝘴𝘺𝘤𝘩𝘪𝘢𝘵𝘳𝘪𝘤 𝘯𝘶𝘳𝘴𝘦 𝘱𝘳𝘢𝘤𝘵𝘪𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯𝘦𝘳

𝘛𝘩𝘦 𝘮𝘰𝘴𝘵 𝘳𝘦𝘸𝘢𝘳𝘥𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘱𝘢𝘳𝘵 𝘰𝘧 𝘮𝘺 𝘫𝘰𝘣 𝘪𝘴 𝘴𝘦𝘦𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘥𝘳𝘢𝘮𝘢𝘵𝘪𝘤 𝘤𝘩𝘢𝘯𝘨𝘦 𝘪𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘤𝘭𝘪𝘦𝘯𝘵𝘴 𝘧𝘳𝘰𝘮 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘵𝘪𝘮𝘦 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘺 𝘸𝘢𝘭𝘬 𝘪𝘯 𝘵𝘰 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘤𝘦𝘯𝘵𝘦𝘳 𝘵𝘰 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘵𝘪𝘮𝘦 𝘸𝘩𝘦𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘺 𝘭𝘦𝘢𝘷𝘦. 𝘛𝘩𝘦𝘺 𝘤𝘰𝘮𝘦 𝘪𝘯 𝘵𝘰 𝘵𝘳𝘦𝘢𝘵𝘮𝘦𝘯𝘵 𝘭𝘰𝘰𝘬𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘵𝘪𝘳𝘦𝘥, 𝘸𝘦𝘢𝘬, 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘣𝘳𝘰𝘬𝘦𝘯. 𝘞𝘩𝘦𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘺 𝘭𝘦𝘢𝘷𝘦 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘺 𝘢𝘳𝘦 𝘢 𝘸𝘩𝘰𝘭𝘦 𝘯𝘦𝘸 𝘱𝘦𝘳𝘴𝘰𝘯 𝘸𝘪𝘵𝘩 𝘩𝘰𝘱𝘦𝘴 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘥𝘳𝘦𝘢𝘮𝘴. 𝘛𝘩𝘦𝘳𝘦 𝘢𝘳𝘦 𝘱𝘩𝘺𝘴𝘪𝘤𝘢𝘭 𝘤𝘩𝘢𝘯𝘨𝘦𝘴, 𝘣𝘶𝘵 𝘮𝘰𝘳𝘦 𝘪𝘮𝘱𝘰𝘳𝘵𝘢𝘯𝘵𝘭𝘺 𝘪𝘴 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘦𝘮𝘰𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯𝘢𝘭 𝘩𝘦𝘢𝘭𝘵𝘩 𝘐 𝘴𝘦𝘦 𝘥𝘦𝘷𝘦𝘭𝘰𝘱. 𝘛𝘩𝘦𝘴𝘦 𝘤𝘭𝘪𝘦𝘯𝘵𝘴 𝘴𝘵𝘳𝘶𝘨𝘨𝘭𝘦 𝘸𝘪𝘵𝘩 𝘯𝘰𝘵 𝘰𝘯𝘭𝘺 𝘢𝘥𝘥𝘪𝘤𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯, 𝘣𝘶𝘵 𝘢 𝘨𝘳𝘦𝘢𝘵 𝘮𝘢𝘫𝘰𝘳𝘪𝘵𝘺 𝘢𝘭𝘴𝘰 𝘩𝘢𝘷𝘦 𝘮𝘦𝘯𝘵𝘢𝘭 𝘩𝘦𝘢𝘭𝘵𝘩 𝘪𝘴𝘴𝘶𝘦𝘴. 𝘐 𝘩𝘢𝘷𝘦 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘱𝘳𝘪𝘷𝘪𝘭𝘦𝘨𝘦 𝘰𝘧 𝘣𝘦𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘢𝘣𝘭𝘦 𝘵𝘰 𝘩𝘦𝘭𝘱 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘴𝘦 𝘤𝘭𝘪𝘦𝘯𝘵𝘴 𝘧𝘪𝘯𝘥 𝘴𝘰𝘮𝘦 𝘱𝘦𝘢𝘤𝘦 𝘸𝘪𝘵𝘩 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘪𝘳 𝘦𝘮𝘰𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯𝘢𝘭 𝘵𝘶𝘳𝘮𝘰𝘪𝘭 𝘵𝘩𝘳𝘰𝘶𝘨𝘩 𝘱𝘴𝘺𝘤𝘩𝘰-𝘱𝘩𝘢𝘳𝘮𝘢𝘤𝘰𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘳𝘢𝘱𝘺. 𝘐 𝘨𝘦𝘵 𝘵𝘰 𝘸𝘪𝘵𝘯𝘦𝘴𝘴 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘴𝘦 𝘤𝘩𝘢𝘯𝘨𝘦𝘴 𝘧𝘪𝘳𝘴𝘵 𝘩𝘢𝘯𝘥, 𝘪𝘵 𝘪𝘴 𝘢𝘯 𝘢𝘮𝘢𝘻𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘱𝘳𝘰𝘤𝘦𝘴𝘴.

𝘐 𝘴𝘩𝘰𝘸 𝘶𝘱 𝘦𝘷𝘦𝘯 𝘥𝘶𝘳𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘴 𝘊𝘰𝘷𝘪𝘥 𝘤𝘳𝘪𝘴𝘪𝘴 𝘣𝘦𝘤𝘢𝘶𝘴𝘦 𝘪𝘵’𝘴 𝘮𝘺 𝘫𝘰𝘣, 𝘢 𝘫𝘰𝘣 𝘐 𝘭𝘰𝘷𝘦, 𝘢 𝘫𝘰𝘣 𝘐 𝘢𝘮 𝘱𝘢𝘴𝘴𝘪𝘰𝘯𝘢𝘵𝘦 𝘢𝘣𝘰𝘶𝘵. 𝘐 𝘢𝘮 𝘧𝘪𝘳𝘴𝘵 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘧𝘰𝘳𝘦𝘮𝘰𝘴𝘵 𝘢 𝘯𝘶𝘳𝘴𝘦 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘵𝘰𝘰𝘬 𝘢𝘯 𝘰𝘢𝘵𝘩 𝘵𝘰 𝘤𝘢𝘳𝘦 𝘧𝘰𝘳 𝘰𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘳 𝘪𝘯𝘥𝘪𝘷𝘪𝘥𝘶𝘢𝘭𝘴 𝘯𝘰 𝘮𝘢𝘵𝘵𝘦𝘳 𝘸𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘤𝘪𝘳𝘤𝘶𝘮𝘴𝘵𝘢𝘯𝘤𝘦𝘴. 𝘐𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘸𝘰𝘳𝘥𝘴 𝘰𝘧 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘍𝘭𝘰𝘳𝘦𝘯𝘤𝘦 𝘕𝘪𝘨𝘩𝘵𝘪𝘯𝘨𝘢𝘭𝘦 𝘱𝘭𝘦𝘥𝘨𝘦 𝘵𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘢𝘭𝘭 𝘯𝘶𝘳𝘴𝘦𝘴 𝘵𝘢𝘬𝘦, ” 𝘐 𝘴𝘰𝘭𝘦𝘮𝘯𝘭𝘺 𝘱𝘭𝘦𝘥𝘨𝘦 𝘮𝘺𝘴𝘦𝘭𝘧 𝘣𝘦𝘧𝘰𝘳𝘦 𝘎𝘰𝘥 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘪𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘱𝘳𝘦𝘴𝘦𝘯𝘤𝘦 𝘰𝘧 𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘴 𝘢𝘴𝘴𝘦𝘮𝘣𝘭𝘺, 𝘵𝘰 𝘱𝘢𝘴𝘴 𝘮𝘺 𝘭𝘪𝘧𝘦 𝘪𝘯 𝘱𝘶𝘳𝘪𝘵𝘺 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘵𝘰 𝘱𝘳𝘢𝘤𝘵𝘪𝘤𝘦 𝘮𝘺 𝘱𝘳𝘰𝘧𝘦𝘴𝘴𝘪𝘰𝘯 𝘧𝘢𝘪𝘵𝘩𝘧𝘶𝘭𝘭𝘺….. 𝘐 𝘸𝘪𝘭𝘭 𝘥𝘦𝘥𝘪𝘤𝘢𝘵𝘦 𝘮𝘺𝘴𝘦𝘭𝘧 𝘵𝘰 𝘥𝘦𝘷𝘰𝘵𝘦𝘥 𝘴𝘦𝘳𝘷𝘪𝘤𝘦 𝘵𝘰 𝘩𝘶𝘮𝘢𝘯 𝘸𝘦𝘭𝘧𝘢𝘳𝘦.” 𝘐 𝘢𝘮 𝘩𝘦𝘳𝘦 𝘵𝘰 𝘥𝘰 𝘦𝘷𝘦𝘳𝘺𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘐 𝘤𝘢𝘯 𝘵𝘰 𝘤𝘢𝘳𝘦 𝘧𝘰𝘳, 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘵𝘰 𝘱𝘳𝘰𝘵𝘦𝘤𝘵 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘴𝘢𝘧𝘦𝘵𝘺 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘩𝘦𝘢𝘭𝘵𝘩 𝘰𝘧 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘤𝘭𝘪𝘦𝘯𝘵𝘴 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘴𝘵𝘢𝘧𝘧 𝘵𝘰 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘣𝘦𝘴𝘵 𝘰𝘧 𝘮𝘺 𝘢𝘣𝘪𝘭𝘪𝘵𝘺 𝘦𝘷𝘦𝘳𝘺 𝘥𝘢𝘺.

𝘐 𝘣𝘦𝘤𝘢𝘮𝘦 𝘱𝘢𝘴𝘴𝘪𝘰𝘯𝘢𝘵𝘦 𝘢𝘣𝘰𝘶𝘵 𝘵𝘳𝘺𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘵𝘰 𝘩𝘦𝘭𝘱 𝘰𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘳𝘴 𝘪𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘪𝘳 𝘫𝘰𝘶𝘳𝘯𝘦𝘺 𝘵𝘰 𝘳𝘦𝘤𝘰𝘷𝘦𝘳 𝘧𝘳𝘰𝘮 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘪𝘳 𝘢𝘥𝘥𝘪𝘤𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯𝘴 𝘢𝘧𝘵𝘦𝘳 𝘴𝘦𝘦𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘮𝘺 𝘴𝘰𝘯, 𝘮𝘺 𝘯𝘦𝘪𝘨𝘩𝘣𝘰𝘳 𝘸𝘩𝘰 𝘸𝘢𝘴 𝘢𝘭𝘴𝘰 𝘮𝘺 𝘨𝘰𝘰𝘥 𝘧𝘳𝘪𝘦𝘯𝘥, 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘩𝘪𝘴 𝘵𝘸𝘰 𝘥𝘢𝘶𝘨𝘩𝘵𝘦𝘳𝘴 𝘣𝘢𝘵𝘵𝘭𝘦 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘪𝘳 𝘥𝘦𝘮𝘰𝘯𝘴 𝘰𝘷𝘦𝘳 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘺𝘦𝘢𝘳𝘴. 𝘔𝘺 𝘴𝘰𝘯 𝘩𝘢𝘴 𝘴𝘵𝘳𝘶𝘨𝘨𝘭𝘦𝘥 𝘸𝘪𝘵𝘩 𝘢𝘥𝘥𝘪𝘤𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯 𝘴𝘪𝘯𝘤𝘦 𝘩𝘪𝘴 𝘭𝘢𝘵𝘦 𝘵𝘦𝘦𝘯𝘢𝘨𝘦 𝘺𝘦𝘢𝘳𝘴. 𝘏𝘦 𝘩𝘢𝘴 𝘣𝘦𝘦𝘯 𝘵𝘰 𝘮𝘶𝘭𝘵𝘪𝘱𝘭𝘦 𝘵𝘳𝘦𝘢𝘵𝘮𝘦𝘯𝘵 𝘧𝘢𝘤𝘪𝘭𝘪𝘵𝘪𝘦𝘴 𝘰𝘯𝘭𝘺 𝘵𝘰 𝘴𝘦𝘦 𝘩𝘪𝘮 𝘳𝘦𝘭𝘢𝘱𝘴𝘦 𝘢𝘨𝘢𝘪𝘯 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘢𝘨𝘢𝘪𝘯. 𝘏𝘦 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘐 𝘩𝘢𝘷𝘦 𝘴𝘱𝘦𝘯𝘵 𝘮𝘢𝘯𝘺 𝘭𝘰𝘯𝘨 𝘩𝘰𝘶𝘳𝘴 𝘵𝘳𝘺𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘵𝘰 𝘧𝘪𝘨𝘶𝘳𝘦 𝘰𝘶𝘵 𝘸𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘥𝘪𝘥 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘥𝘪𝘥 𝘯𝘰𝘵 𝘩𝘦𝘭𝘱 𝘪𝘯 𝘩𝘪𝘴 𝘳𝘦𝘤𝘰𝘷𝘦𝘳𝘺, 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘸𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘮𝘪𝘨𝘩𝘵 𝘩𝘢𝘷𝘦 𝘣𝘦𝘦𝘯 𝘥𝘪𝘧𝘧𝘦𝘳𝘦𝘯𝘵 𝘵𝘰 𝘣𝘦 𝘮𝘰𝘳𝘦 𝘩𝘦𝘭𝘱𝘧𝘶𝘭. 𝘐 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘯 𝘱𝘭𝘦𝘥𝘨𝘦𝘥 𝘵𝘰 𝘮𝘢𝘬𝘦 𝘪𝘵 𝘮𝘺 𝘮𝘪𝘴𝘴𝘪𝘰𝘯 𝘵𝘰 𝘥𝘰 𝘦𝘷𝘦𝘳𝘺𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘐 𝘤𝘰𝘶𝘭𝘥 𝘵𝘰 𝘩𝘦𝘭𝘱 𝘰𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘳𝘴 𝘴𝘵𝘳𝘶𝘨𝘨𝘭𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘸𝘪𝘵𝘩 𝘢𝘥𝘥𝘪𝘤𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯 𝘯𝘰 𝘮𝘢𝘵𝘵𝘦𝘳 𝘸𝘩𝘢𝘵. 𝘐 𝘸𝘰𝘳𝘳𝘺 𝘦𝘷𝘦𝘳𝘺 𝘥𝘢𝘺 𝘵𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘮𝘺 𝘴𝘰𝘯 𝘸𝘪𝘭𝘭 𝘳𝘦𝘭𝘢𝘱𝘴𝘦, 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘸𝘰𝘳𝘴𝘦 𝘺𝘦𝘵 𝘥𝘪𝘦. 𝘔𝘺 𝘯𝘦𝘪𝘨𝘩𝘣𝘰𝘳 𝘥𝘪𝘥 𝘳𝘦𝘤𝘦𝘯𝘵𝘭𝘺 𝘰𝘷𝘦𝘳𝘥𝘰𝘴𝘦 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘥𝘪𝘦 𝘢𝘵 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘢𝘨𝘦 𝘰𝘧 60. 𝘖𝘯𝘦 𝘰𝘧 𝘩𝘪𝘴 𝘥𝘢𝘶𝘨𝘩𝘵𝘦𝘳𝘴 𝘩𝘢𝘴 𝘣𝘦𝘦𝘯 𝘪𝘯 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘰𝘶𝘵 𝘰𝘧 𝘵𝘳𝘦𝘢𝘵𝘮𝘦𝘯𝘵 𝘧𝘰𝘳 𝘺𝘦𝘢𝘳𝘴, 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘪𝘴 𝘤𝘶𝘳𝘳𝘦𝘯𝘵𝘭𝘺 𝘪𝘯 𝘵𝘳𝘦𝘢𝘵𝘮𝘦𝘯𝘵 𝘢𝘨𝘢𝘪𝘯. 𝘏𝘪𝘴 𝘰𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘳 𝘥𝘢𝘶𝘨𝘩𝘵𝘦𝘳 𝘩𝘢𝘴 𝘣𝘦𝘦𝘯 𝘪𝘯 𝘳𝘦𝘤𝘰𝘷𝘦𝘳𝘺 𝘧𝘳𝘰𝘮 𝘢 𝘩𝘦𝘳𝘰𝘪𝘯 𝘢𝘥𝘥𝘪𝘤𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯 𝘧𝘰𝘳 11 𝘺𝘦𝘢𝘳𝘴. 𝘛𝘳𝘦𝘢𝘵𝘮𝘦𝘯𝘵 𝘤𝘢𝘯 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘥𝘰𝘦𝘴 𝘸𝘰𝘳𝘬. 𝘐 𝘸𝘢𝘯𝘵 𝘵𝘰 𝘵𝘳𝘺 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘩𝘦𝘭𝘱 𝘰𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘳 𝘧𝘢𝘮𝘪𝘭𝘪𝘦𝘴 𝘯𝘰𝘵 𝘩𝘢𝘷𝘦 𝘵𝘰 𝘸𝘢𝘵𝘤𝘩 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘪𝘳 𝘭𝘰𝘷𝘦𝘥 𝘰𝘯𝘦𝘴 𝘥𝘪𝘦 𝘧𝘳𝘰𝘮 𝘢𝘥𝘥𝘪𝘤𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯.

Meet Star Nurse Elizabeth Eure of Avenues Recovery Center: Find Your Way Home of Louisiana!

Avenues: 𝘞𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘥𝘳𝘪𝘷𝘦𝘴 you 𝘵𝘰 𝘴𝘩𝘰𝘸 𝘶𝘱 𝘦𝘷𝘦𝘳𝘺 𝘥𝘢𝘺 𝘦𝘷𝘦𝘯 𝘥𝘶𝘳𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘊𝘖𝘝𝘐𝘋?

Liz: 𝘐𝙄𝙩 𝙢𝙖𝙠𝙚𝙨 𝙣𝙤 𝙙𝙞𝙛𝙛𝙚𝙧𝙚𝙣𝙘𝙚 𝙞𝙛 𝙞𝙩’𝙨 𝙖 𝘾𝙊𝙑𝙄𝘿 𝙤𝙪𝙩𝙗𝙧𝙚𝙖𝙠. 𝙔𝙤𝙪 𝙬𝙚𝙣𝙩 𝙞𝙣𝙩𝙤 𝙣𝙪𝙧𝙨𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙩𝙤 𝙝𝙚𝙡𝙥 𝙥𝙚𝙤𝙥𝙡𝙚 𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙮𝙤𝙪𝙧 𝙡𝙞𝙘𝙚𝙣𝙨𝙚 𝙙𝙤𝙚𝙨 𝙣𝙤𝙩 𝙨𝙖𝙮 “𝙄 𝙬𝙞𝙡𝙡 𝙝𝙚𝙡𝙥 𝙥𝙚𝙤𝙥𝙡𝙚 𝙞𝙛”. 𝙔𝙤𝙪 𝙜𝙤 𝙞𝙣𝙩𝙤 𝙩𝙝𝙞𝙨 𝙛𝙞𝙚𝙡𝙙 𝙠𝙣𝙤𝙬𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙧𝙚 𝙖𝙧𝙚 𝙧𝙞𝙨𝙠𝙨 𝙩𝙝𝙖𝙩 𝙘𝙤𝙢𝙚 𝙬𝙞𝙩𝙝 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙟𝙤𝙗.

Avenues: 𝘞𝘩𝘢𝘵’𝘴 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘮𝘰𝘴𝘵 𝘳𝘦𝘸𝘢𝘳𝘥𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘱𝘢𝘳𝘵 𝘰𝘧 your 𝘫𝘰𝘣?

Liz: 𝙏𝙝𝙚 𝙢𝙤𝙨𝙩 𝙧𝙚𝙬𝙖𝙧𝙙𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙥𝙖𝙧𝙩 𝙤𝙛 𝙩𝙝𝙞𝙨 𝙟𝙤𝙗 𝙞𝙨 𝙝𝙚𝙡𝙥𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙤𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙧𝙨…𝙟𝙪𝙨𝙩 𝙡𝙞𝙠𝙚 𝙧𝙪𝙣𝙣𝙚𝙧𝙨 𝙜𝙚𝙩 𝙖 𝙙𝙤𝙥𝙖𝙢𝙞𝙣𝙚 𝙝𝙞𝙜𝙝 𝙗𝙮 𝙧𝙪𝙣𝙣𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙬𝙚 𝙜𝙚𝙩 𝙖 𝙙𝙤𝙥𝙖𝙢𝙞𝙣𝙚 𝙝𝙞𝙜𝙝 𝙗𝙮 𝙝𝙚𝙡𝙥𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙤𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙧𝙨.

Avenues: 𝘞𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘤𝘩𝘢𝘭𝘭𝘦𝘯𝘨𝘦𝘴/𝘴𝘢𝘤𝘳𝘪𝘧𝘪𝘤𝘦𝘴 do you 𝘮𝘢𝘬𝘦 𝘵𝘰 𝘸𝘰𝘳𝘬 𝘪𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘴 𝘧𝘪𝘦𝘭𝘥 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘩𝘰𝘸 have you 𝘰𝘷𝘦𝘳𝘤𝘰𝘮𝘦 them?

Liz: 𝙏𝙝𝙚 𝙢𝙤𝙨𝙩 𝙘𝙝𝙖𝙡𝙡𝙚𝙣𝙜𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙥𝙖𝙧𝙩 𝙩𝙤 𝙩𝙝𝙞𝙨 𝙟𝙤𝙗 𝙞𝙨 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙧𝙞𝙨𝙠𝙨 𝙬𝙚 𝙛𝙖𝙘𝙚 𝙚𝙖𝙘𝙝 𝙙𝙖𝙮 𝙗𝙪𝙩 𝙮𝙤𝙪 𝙘𝙖𝙣’𝙩 𝙨𝙞𝙩 𝙗𝙖𝙘𝙠 𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙨𝙖𝙮 “𝙬𝙤𝙬 𝙡𝙤𝙤𝙠 𝙖𝙩 𝙢𝙚 𝙗𝙚𝙘𝙖𝙪𝙨𝙚 𝙚𝙫𝙚𝙧𝙮 𝙥𝙚𝙧𝙨𝙤𝙣 𝙞𝙣 𝙚𝙫𝙚𝙧𝙮 𝙟𝙤𝙗 𝙛𝙖𝙘𝙚𝙨 𝙘𝙝𝙖𝙡𝙡𝙚𝙣𝙜𝙚𝙨, 𝙧𝙞𝙨𝙠𝙨 𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙨𝙖𝙘𝙧𝙞𝙛𝙞𝙘𝙚𝙨. 𝙔𝙤𝙪 𝙤𝙫𝙚𝙧𝙘𝙤𝙢𝙚 𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙢 𝙗𝙚𝙘𝙖𝙪𝙨𝙚 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙧𝙚𝙬𝙖𝙧𝙙𝙨 𝙤𝙛 𝙝𝙚𝙡𝙥𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙥𝙚𝙤𝙥𝙡𝙚 𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙨𝙖𝙫𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙡𝙞𝙫𝙚𝙨 𝙞𝙨 𝙛𝙖𝙧 𝙜𝙧𝙚𝙖𝙩𝙚𝙧 𝙩𝙝𝙖𝙣 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙧𝙞𝙨𝙠𝙨. 𝙄 𝙬𝙖𝙠𝙚 𝙚𝙖𝙘𝙝 𝙢𝙤𝙧𝙣𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙠𝙣𝙤𝙬𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙩𝙝𝙖𝙩 𝙂𝙤𝙙 𝙞𝙨 𝙡𝙚𝙖𝙙𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙢𝙚 𝙙𝙤𝙬𝙣 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙥𝙖𝙩𝙝 𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙩𝙝𝙚𝙧𝙚 𝙞𝙨 𝙥𝙪𝙧𝙥𝙤𝙨𝙚 𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙧𝙚𝙖𝙨𝙤𝙣. 𝙄 𝙖𝙢 𝙬𝙝𝙚𝙧𝙚 𝙄 𝙖𝙢 𝙢𝙚𝙖𝙣𝙩 𝙩𝙤 𝙗𝙚 𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙄 𝙙𝙤𝙣’𝙩 𝙬𝙤𝙧𝙧𝙮 𝙖𝙗𝙤𝙪𝙩 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙧𝙚𝙨𝙩.

Avenues: 𝘞𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘪𝘯𝘴𝘱𝘪𝘳𝘦𝘴 you 𝘸𝘰𝘳𝘬𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘪𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘢𝘥𝘥𝘪𝘤𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯 𝘧𝘪𝘦𝘭𝘥 𝘴𝘱𝘦𝘤𝘪𝘧𝘪𝘤𝘢𝘭𝘭𝘺?

Liz: 𝙈𝙮 𝙞𝙣𝙨𝙥𝙞𝙧𝙖𝙩𝙞𝙤𝙣 𝙘𝙤𝙢𝙚𝙨 𝙛𝙧𝙤𝙢 𝙬𝙤𝙧𝙠𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙬𝙞𝙩𝙝 𝙖 𝙥𝙤𝙥𝙪𝙡𝙖𝙩𝙞𝙤𝙣 𝙩𝙝𝙖𝙩 𝙨𝙪𝙛𝙛𝙚𝙧𝙨 𝙛𝙧𝙤𝙢 𝙖 𝙙𝙞𝙨𝙚𝙖𝙨𝙚 𝙩𝙝𝙖𝙩 𝙞𝙨 𝙣𝙤𝙩 𝙜𝙚𝙣𝙚𝙧𝙖𝙡𝙡𝙮 𝙖𝙘𝙘𝙚𝙥𝙩𝙚𝙙 𝙤𝙧 𝙞𝙨 𝙜𝙧𝙚𝙖𝙩𝙡𝙮 𝙢𝙞𝙨𝙪𝙣𝙙𝙚𝙧𝙨𝙩𝙤𝙤𝙙 𝙗𝙮 𝙨𝙤𝙘𝙞𝙚𝙩𝙮. 𝙏𝙝𝙚𝙧𝙚 𝙖𝙧𝙚 𝙣𝙤 𝙏-𝙎𝙝𝙞𝙧𝙩𝙨 𝙤𝙧 𝙗𝙪𝙢𝙥𝙚𝙧 𝙨𝙩𝙞𝙘𝙠𝙚𝙧𝙨 𝙩𝙝𝙖𝙩 𝙨𝙖𝙮 “𝙄 𝙖𝙢 𝙖𝙣 𝙖𝙙𝙙𝙞𝙘𝙩” 𝙤𝙧 “𝙢𝙮 𝙠𝙞𝙙 𝙞𝙨 𝙖 𝙨𝙪𝙗𝙨𝙩𝙖𝙣𝙘𝙚 𝙖𝙗𝙪𝙨𝙚𝙧”. 𝙏𝙝𝙞𝙨 𝙥𝙤𝙥𝙪𝙡𝙖𝙩𝙞𝙤𝙣 𝙞𝙨 𝙨𝙤 𝙩𝙝𝙖𝙣𝙠𝙛𝙪𝙡 𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙜𝙧𝙖𝙩𝙚𝙛𝙪𝙡 𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙩𝙝𝙖𝙩’𝙨 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙞𝙣𝙨𝙥𝙞𝙧𝙖𝙩𝙞𝙤𝙣.

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Brooke Abner,

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